Dewatering

Dewatering


Dewatering

 

What is dewatering?

Dewatering and construction dewatering is the term used to describe the action of groundwater or surface waters in a construction site. Normally, dewatering is carried out by pumping or evaporation and is usually carried out on the lower water table which may cause problems before or during excavation. Dewatering can also refer to the process of removing water from the soil with wet classification. The correct water intake plan can be used to comply with some of the best management practices related to the SWPP plan. Most of them are used in construction sites where there is water or insufficient slope or high water table accumulated during construction feedings, trenches and excavations. In construction projects, this water must be removed to continue to work as planned or to ensure a safe workplace. Normally builders tend to use water pumps to drain water from these areas, but if they do not pay attention to where the water is discharged, erosion and other problems may occur. It is important to monitor best management practices when pumping water into lakes, wetlands or direct storm sewers.

 

Waterless Measures

Dewatering activities should be done correctly in order to prevent soil erosion in the construction site. It is also important to choose the best place for discharge when you are away from water bodies or when you can catch basins. There are a large number of dewatering products, such as dehydrated drop bags, which can be used to remove deposits in the pumped water. Dewatering can be done by various methods. However, the simplest is the gravity drain using drainage channels that carry the water of the area to be discharged to the discharge point. Other suitable ways for dewatering are water pumping, siphoning, and handling of large-scale construction machinery buckets for draining and draining water from the selected area. Ground channels used for dewatering can also be protected by trench liners and additional protection should be provided to reduce water speeds and minimize erosion. In order to prevent additional erosion at the unloading point, it is recommended that the riprap covering with geotextile is protected.